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Summer flounder

Summer flounder (Paralichthys dentatus) are found in inshore and offshore waters from Nova Scotia, Canada to the east coast of Florida. In the U.S., they are most abundant in the Mid-Atlantic region from Cape Cod, Massachusetts to Cape Fear, North Carolina.

Summer flounder usually begin to spawn at age two or three, at lengths of about 10 inches. Spawning occurs in the fall while the fish are moving offshore. Spawning migration is linked to sexual maturity, with the oldest and largest fish migrating first. As in their seasonal migrations, spawning summer flounder in the northern portion of the geographic range spawn and move offshore (depths of 120 to 600 feet) earlier than those in the southern part of the range. Larvae migrate to inshore coastal and estuarine areas from October to May. The larvae, or fry, move to bottom waters upon reaching the coast and spend their first year in bays and other inshore areas. At the end of their first year, some juveniles join the adult offshore migration.

Adults spend most of their life on or near the sea bottom burrowing in the sandy substrate. Flounder lie in ambush and wait for their prey. They are quick and efficient predators with well-developed teeth allowing them to capture small fish, squid, sea worms, shrimp, and other crustaceans.

The Council met Monday through Thursday of last week. On day one, there was a first “framework” meeting for a possible change to the Council’s “Risk Policy”. While this is undoubtedly complicated and wonky, the Council’s “Risk Policy” can best be described as policy articulating how much risk they want to take given the best

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Back in September; the Greater Atlantic Regional Office of NOAA Fisheries (GARFO) announced  mandatory electronic reporting requirements effecting ANY FOR HIRE VESSEL that fishes under a federal permit and is endorsed to catch certain Mid Atlantic Council managed species. Many New England based charter boats, some who don’t even realize they are supposed to have a federal

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Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission Summer Meeting Alexandria VA / August 1-3 2017. The overarching highlight of the ASMFC Summer Meeting was the Menhaden Management Board which continued development of Amendment 3 to the Menhaden Fishery Management Plan. The Board received a stock assessment update and as was expected, Menhaden remain healthy and are not overfished

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  Some may be cheering the Secretary of Commerce’s decision to overrule ASMFC on summer flounder, but in the end, Jersey may have really screwed us If you are a regular reader, you likely know the controversy surrounding summer flounder (aka fluke).  And I’m guessing your probably up to speed on the striped bass situation

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, June 1, 2017 PRESS CONTACT, TINA BERGER, 703.842.0740  ASMFC Finds New Jersey Out of Compliance with Addendum XXVIII to the Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass FMP  Arlington, VA – The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has found the State of New Jersey out of compliance with the mandatory management measures

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The ASMFC met in Alexandra VA between MA8 & May 11, 2017. The following is a summary of what the staff here at Fissues feels were important enough discussion to take up our readers time. ASMFC Striped Bass Management Board voted not to move forward with Draft Addendum V to Amendment 6 of the Atlantic

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Summer flounder are a medium-sized flatfish abundant in the Mid-Atlantic region, which support important recreational and commercial fisheries in states between Massachusetts and North Carolina. Distribution has varied quite a bit over the years. Back in the 90s, when size limit was 14” and the stock was undoubtedly depleted, the center of abundance was off

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